How to Teach Your Kids About Climate Change

“There is no doubt that climate change has a huge impact on people,” said Dr. Mary Anne Franks, the chair of the Department of Ecology at the University of California, Berkeley.

“But I think people have to think about how much impact it has, and how much it’s going to be.

There are no easy answers.

But you need to think hard about what the consequences are, and what the future looks like.

The next two years are going to make a huge difference.

And you need a lot of work to make sure you do it right.”

The study, titled “Exploring Climate Change in an Anthropogenic Household,” is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

For the study, the authors surveyed nearly 700 families in Los Angeles County, California, from ages 4 to 84, and looked at what they saw and what they thought about climate change in their homes.

The authors also surveyed the families’ kids, asking about what they’d heard and read about climate issues.

They also asked the kids how their families felt about climate changes.

The findings?

The study found that children were more likely to say climate change was a problem, to have more questions about the subject, and to think that climate impacts were serious.

They were also more likely than their peers to have expressed concerns about climate impacts.

The study is a huge step toward understanding the impacts of climate change, said Franks.

“I think we have a lot more to learn from these families, but I think this is an important first step,” she said.

“Climate change is a very complicated subject,” said Franks, who was also the director of the environmental studies department at the U.S. Geological Survey.

“We have a very limited knowledge of how these impacts are going be felt and how it’s impacting ecosystems, so it’s hard to make that kind of judgment about the overall impacts of this phenomenon.

But we have to do a lot better to understand it.”

The authors also found that families were more worried about the impacts in the next five to 10 years, than in the past 20 years.

That suggests they may be able to adapt to climate change sooner, rather than later.

Climate change impacts can range from short-term impacts such as hotter summers and cooler winters, to longer-term effects such as more frequent and extreme weather events.

In California, which has been hit particularly hard by wildfires, wildfires, and the state’s drought, there is evidence of the impact.

But in general, the impact is more immediate, the study found.

So what does the future hold for climate change?

“There is going to come a time where we are going back to a warmer climate,” said Frank.

“There are also some climate models that are suggesting that we may be in a situation where we will have to get back to more average temperatures.”

The findings also suggest that the climate impacts will continue to get worse in the future, but that the longer-run effects could be significantly worse.

In particular, the longer the effects of climate warming, the worse the climate effects get.

But the study did not directly address whether the longer a climate warms, the more severe the impacts become.

The researchers say they do not have a clear answer to that.