‘It’s time to move on’: The story of the environmental crisis

From its opening to the end of June, the annual Queensland Government-sponsored ecological crisis conference, dubbed The Ecological Crisis, has been held every five years in the state since 1972.

This year, it will be held in Melbourne, the capital city of Western Australia, with the main speaker being the late John Mackay, who died in 2015.

Mr Mackay’s speech on Monday is likely to be the last time we see him speak on this stage.

But the conference’s success has had an impact beyond the small, fringe audience.

In the last decade, its popularity has grown exponentially.

“I would like to say a big thank you to everyone who has attended The Ecotic Crisis, the organisers and those who have participated,” Mr Macky wrote on Twitter.

The event’s popularity has given it an audience that is more broadly based than previous events.

“We have a large number of people in Western Australia who have been involved in conservation and have had a direct impact on this country, and we need more of them,” Mr MacKay said.

“So we’re looking to broaden the appeal of The Ecotecological Crisis to other regions of the world.”

It is this appeal that has attracted Mr Mackoy, who is also the founder of the University of Western Australian and a former member of the state’s state environmental council.

“This is not a party for the big fish in this debate,” he said.