10 Things You Should Know About the ‘Environmental Downturn’

By Steve KullmanPosted March 03, 2017 07:03:51In 2016, the United States was in the midst of a massive natural disaster, a natural catastrophe caused by human actions.

In the wake of the devastating floods in Louisiana and Mississippi, we witnessed the rise of an extreme right wing political movement, and the rise to power of a political candidate whose platform was the eradication of all the natural resources and resources from the United Kingdom.

The result of this election cycle was the establishment of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), a UN organization that has since been responsible for the United Nation’s policies on global warming, the destruction of our environment, and our climate.

In order to understand what’s happening right now in the world, it’s important to first understand the history of this issue, and then take a step back to understand the present situation.

The history of global warmingAs far back as the 1960s, the world was experiencing unprecedented levels of warming, and that was happening even though the world population was expanding at a staggering rate.

The warming trend accelerated in the 1980s, when global population increased by more than 10 million people, and by the turn of the century, the global population was nearing 2 billion people.

In fact, the rate of population growth in the first half of this century was faster than in any other century since the 19th century.

The global population has increased at a rate that has not been seen since the end of the Little Ice Age, which lasted from the mid-1870s to the early 1900s.

As a result of that, the climate in the northern hemisphere was much warmer than the climate of the northern oceans.

In the mid 20th century, humanity was experiencing a crisis of environmental destruction.

During the first years of the 20th Century, there were many outbreaks of malaria, tuberculosis, and other diseases.

The World Health Organization estimated that more than 1.7 billion people worldwide had died of those diseases, and another one million died from starvation.

This led to massive migration, which displaced tens of millions of people and brought enormous social problems, including widespread poverty and violence.

But the most damaging consequence of the global migration was the destruction that occurred due to the lack of a sustainable climate in which human beings could live and reproduce.

In short, the current crisis of climate change is due to human actions that are contributing to climate change.

The climate has already changed, and there is no reason to expect that the changes will continue to get worse, as the world continues to expand and human beings are able to adapt to changing conditions.

What caused the climate crisisThe cause of the climate change crisis is not clear.

The IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report, released in 2017, concluded that the human influence on the climate is so large that the effects of human actions on climate will eventually be “unbearable.”

In other words, the consequences of climate disruption are too severe to be undone.

The report further stated that this change will lead to “significant” impacts in the future, and it’s imperative that we take steps to address this issue.

The most prominent of these steps, the development of technologies to mitigate the climate disruption, is a crucial step to mitigate these consequences.

However, this is not the only reason to take action.

Many scientists believe that we need to focus on the fact that we’re already experiencing climate disruption.

It’s true that the climate has changed over the past several decades, and this has caused some major changes.

But a majority of scientists believe the impacts of climate changes are already having an impact on human beings.

And they are having an effect on the Earth.

According to a recent paper published in Science, the average annual temperature in the United states has increased by about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit since the turn