Why is a California forest fire so rare?

In the years leading up to last summer’s massive fire in the central and eastern U.S., scientists had predicted the fires would be among the most destructive in recorded history.

They also predicted that the wildfire season would be unusually long and scorching.

But as wildfires across the country have exploded, the prediction has been met with skepticism.

Some scientists say the fire seasons are too short, others that the long-term outlook for fires is too gloomy, and others say the prediction was overblown.

But the debate over the fires’ future has become a major topic in the science community, and scientists are now engaged in a debate over how much time the fires have to burn to trigger climate change.

The fire season in California, the epicenter of the fires, is scheduled to end in November.

It’s the longest fire season on record, with fire suppression officials anticipating at least two more weeks of scorching weather.

But scientists say there is a lot more time left to act.

The fires are a testament to the power of human nature, said Dr. Michael E. Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University.

The number of fires in the U.K., for instance, has been declining for years.

That’s why scientists are increasingly worried about how much longer it will take to slow global warming.

“We’re running out of time,” said Mann, a former climate scientist and climate scientist at Penn State.

“The fires are not going to be gone in a year.

They are going to keep burning, and they are going and they will keep burning for some time to come.”

The National Park Service says it’s too early to predict how much more fire will burn in the coming months.

“In California, as in the United States, the season is a matter of local weather and conditions,” the park service said in a statement.

“California has historically had a particularly extreme fire season, with many fires beginning in mid-September.

Our fire season has been especially long, with fires burning from early June through late November.

We are confident that this fire season will continue to be a challenging, but ultimately manageable, event.

As California continues to experience a severe fire season and the fires continue to burn, the impacts of climate change will be felt even more profoundly than in previous years.

In the coming weeks and months, we will be watching the fires closely and are actively engaged in the effort to prevent wildfires from becoming a problem for California residents and visitors.”

The fires burned through the Central Valley, where farmers and ranchers struggle to survive amid drought.

In northern California, they burned through California’s western Sierra Nevada foothills, killing more than 500 people.

The wildfires also sparked a massive wildfire in the far northern Rocky Mountains that forced the closure of the National Park System.

The heat wave was also felt across much of the country, including parts of New England, New York, and Pennsylvania.

In New York City, a wildfire burning near Lake Ontario killed at least six people.

At least seven people died in the state of Maryland, according to the state Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

In California, officials said the fire season was longer than in years past.

The National Weather Service said the fires in California began in mid to late September.

Fire season dates were revised on Thursday to begin Oct. 13, and will run through the end of October.